5 New Years Resolutions for Teachers

As the new year rolls around, it’s natural that we all start thinking about our New Year’s resolutions. A chance for a fresh start and revitalized energy. Unfortunately, we can all be guilty of setting resolutions that aren’t quite realistic, and while dreams of grand changes for the year ahead can feel inspiring, we can’t always follow through. To help make this year different, here are some more realistic New Year’s resolutions for 2022…


1. Declutter, refresh, and reorganize.

When is there a better time to refresh the classroom, if not in January? You could donate some of your old stuff and get rid of anything broken or completely worn out. Reorganize your files and ask yourself what you really need to keep. You don’t need to do it all in a day—try to set yourself a task one week, another the next, and perhaps take advantage of the post-holiday sales to buy some new storage. You’ll be surprised at how much an organized space can positively affect your mindset.

2. Drink enough water, and make time for a proper lunch!

We commend teachers for always putting their students’ needs first, but to be at your best you also need to take care of your own needs. We know that you’re busy, and some days it can be hard to find time to even go to the toilet, but staying hydrated keeps us healthy and helps your body work better.

It’s recommended that adults drink 2 (yes, 2!) liters of water per day. To help you get closer to this goal, why not set an alarm or buy a bottle with time markings to remind you to take a few extra sips of water than you usually would.

You also need fuel in your tank for it to run, so if you struggle to make time for a hearty lunch during your working day, why not set the goal of starting your day with a good breakfast and make sure you have your favorite snacks at hand for when you do get the chance to take a break.

3. Silence the inner critic.

That little voice at the back of your head nitpicking at everything you do… tell it to be quiet. We criticize ourselves far too easily and often expect absolute perfection, but it just isn’t realistic. You don’t need to be perfect all of the time (or even any of the time)—you’re allowed to make mistakes or have a bad day and know that you’re still a great teacher. Be kind to yourself!

4. Celebrate the little moments.

Celebrating the little moments—yours and your students—is so important. Sure, it’s great when we have an important observation, and it goes spectacularly, but what about those every day aha! moments? A student understands that tricky concept they’ve been struggling with, or—and it really can be as small as this—you managed to finish your morning coffee while it was still hot! Celebrate all of those moments because they’re all worthy of celebration.

5. Remind yourself often why you became a teacher.

It’s easy to get caught up in all of the stress of being a teacher and lose the passion and drive that motivated you to teach in the first place. Why not try writing down all of the reasons you became a teacher in the first place or make a note of things that make you smile in the classroom. Find any way to remind yourself why you started and what inspires you to keep going.


Get the latest news from Twig Education.

Free webinars and professional learning straight to your inbox.

4 Reasons You Should Practice Student-Centered Learning in Your Classroom

Did you know that after listening to a lecture for 10–15 minutes, students start to disengage from a lesson?1 Student-centered learning is a pedagogical approach that moves away from this more traditional method of teaching—where teacher instruction is the focus—to putting student interests first. Let’s take a closer look at some key reasons you should integrate student-centered learning into your classroom…

1. Student-centered classrooms foster student autonomy

In student-centered classrooms, students take ownership of their own learning—taking an active role in decision making, goal setting, and lesson planning. Of course, this doesn’t mean that students can choose not to participate in math or geography if they don’t find those subjects interesting. Instead, teachers should find ways to intertwine individual interests with the key learning points of a lesson. In essence, the educator is no longer a lecturer but a facilitator, constantly assessing how they can better create learning opportunities.2

In practice, it can be as simple as giving your students a few options on how a topic could be taught and taking a class vote. Alternatively, where possible, plan a few different activities that approach the topic from different angles and ask your students which they would like to take part in. Give them the choice and autonomy to let you know how they learn best.

2. Students learn to communicate and collaborate

Communication and collaboration is at the core of all student-centered classrooms. As students are encouraged to voice their needs, they are learning how to effectively communicate with their teachers and peers. The classroom becomes a space for problem-solving and working together—students aren’t reprimanded for asking questions, they’re encouraged to.

3. Student-centered learning approaches can increase positive attitudes in the classroom

It’s much easier to absorb information and even find learning fun when the relevance of what is being taught is clear. How can we expect young people to stay positive and focused in the classroom if, frankly, they’re bored and disengaged? Student-centered learning encourages students to be intrinsically motivated, explore real-world problems that relate to their own lives and recognize that their ideas are worthy of respect.3 The result is a classroom full of students who are excited to learn, and isn’t that what it’s all about?

4. Students develop better resilience

It can be remarkably unmotivating to feel as though we aren’t succeeding, even as adults. Now, imagine how this must feel to a young person, in an environment where they know they’re supposed to be learning, watching their peers excel while perceiving themselves to be a failure. Unfortunately, this is commonplace in today’s classrooms—where the emphasis on summative assessment strategies can result in pupils comparing themselves with one another.4

Feedback in student-centered classrooms centers around formative assessment—for example, ongoing feedback and goal-setting—enabling students to identify gaps in their own knowledge and understand where they need to develop. An abundance of evidence has shown that this type of assessment cultivates long-term resilience as the students learn that, whether or not their work is correct, it is part of their learning process.5


  1. https://www.google.co.uk/books/edition/The_Routledge_International_Handbook_of/MujyDwAAQBAJ?hl=en&gbpv=1&dq=child+centered+learning&printsec=frontcover
  2. https://potatopirates.game/blogs/learning/why-student-centered-learning-matters-and-how-to-apply-it
  3. https://stemeducationjournal.springeropen.com/articles/10.1186/s40594-018-0131-6
  4. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/241465214_Student-centred_learning_What_does_it_mean_for_students_and_lecturers
  5. https://suitable-education.uk/systematic-review-confirms-that-assessment-damages-motivation-to-learn/


Get the latest news from Twig Education.

Free webinars and professional learning straight to your inbox.

¿Qué son las ideas centrales disciplinares? | NGSS

Los NGSS o Estándares de Ciencias de la Próxima Generación se enfocan en desarrollar los hábitos y habilidades que los científicos e ingenieros usan en su vida diaria, fomentando el cuestionamiento, la investigación y la elaboración de conclusiones basadas en evidencias. Están formulados para ayudar a los alumnos a aprender cómo pensar, más que decirles qué pensar, mientras los docentes guían a los alumnos a generar sus propias conclusiones a través de pruebas y razonamiento. Mediante los NGSS, estamos preparando a las futuras generaciones a ser independientes, responsables y proactivas ante los retos actuales del mundo.

Las ideas centraless disciplinares, o DCIs (del inglés Disciplinary Core Ideas), son una de las tres dimensiones que forman los Estándares de Ciencias de la Próxima Generación (NGSS). Las DCIs son componentes clave de la educación de ciencias e incluyen ideas que son importantes a través de una o múltiples disciplinas de ingeniería. De forma sencilla, son grandes ideas que los alumnos necesitan conocer para ser capaces de entender el mundo a su alrededor. Las DCIs forman un marco conceptual a través del cual los alumnos pueden entender las disciplinas científicas. (1)

La NSTA enumera cuatro criterios de los cuales un DCI debe cumplir por lo menos dos, pero idealmente cuatro: 

  • Tener una amplia importancia a través de múltiple ciencias o disciplinas de ingeniería o ser un concepto clave de una sola disciplina.
  • Brindar una herramienta clave para comprender o investigar más ideas complejas y resolver problemas.
  • Relacionar a los intereses y vida de los alumnos o estar conectado con intereses sociales o personales que requieren conocimiento científico o tecnológico.
  • Poder enseñarlo o aprenderlo a través de múltiples grados en mayores niveles de profundidad y sofisticación (2)

Las DCIs están divididas entre cuatro campos: Ciencias de la vida, ciencias de la Tierra y el espacio, ciencias físicas, ingeniería, tecnología y la aplicación de ciencias. A través de estos cuatro campos hay diferentes grupos de ideas que generan complejidad a través del proceso de los alumnos en sus años escolares:

Ciencias de la vida

  • LS1: De moléculas a organismos: estructuras y procesos.
  • LS2: Ecosistemas: Interacciones, energía, y dinámicas.
  • LS3: Herencia: Heredad y variación de rasgos.
  • LS4: Evolución Biológica: Unidad y diversidad.

Ciencias de la Tierra y el espacio

  • ESS1: El lugar de la Tierra en el universo.
  • ESS2: Sistemas terrestres.
  • ESS3: Actividad humana y de la Tierra.

Ciencias físicas

  • PS1: La materia y sus interacciones.
  • PS2: Movimiento y estabilidad: Fuerzas e Interacciones
  • PS3: Energía
  • PS4: Ondas y sus aplicaciones en tecnologías para transferencia de información

Ingeniería, Tecnología y la aplicación de ciencias

  • ETS1: Diseño de ingeniería

Los DCIs no sólo generan complejidad en si mismas, sino que también extienden la complejidad sobre ellos en conjunto a lo largo del trayecto de la educación de ciencias del alumno, permitiendo a los alumnos formar una comprensión más profunda del mundo y comprender los fenómenos. Las DCIs están entrelazadas con las SEPs y los CCCs, ofreciendo oportunidades a los alumnos de aplicar estas prácticas y conceptos a diferentes ideas de base.

¿Cómo nos aseguramos de cubrir los DCIs? 

Twig Science es un programa basado en fenómenos para edades de Preescolar a Secundaria creado específicamente para asegurar que todos los alumnos tienen un entendimiento interno de los conceptos transversales, las prácticas de ciencia e ingeniería y las ideas centrales interdisciplinares. En Twig Science, los alumnos descubren docenas de diferentes roles STEM a la vez que se vuelven más creativos en resolver problemas, entendiendo la ciencia de fenómenos del mundo real.

Aprende más sobre Twig Science.

  1. https://www.nsta.org/blog/whats-so-special-about-disciplinary-core-ideas-part-1
  2. ttps://ngss.nsta.org/DisciplinaryCoreIdeasTop.aspx

¡Recibe las novedades de Twig Education!

Además de contenido académico gratuito directamente a tu bandeja de entrada 

¿Qué son los conceptos transversales? | NGSS

Los NGSS o Estándares de Ciencias de la Próxima Generación se enfocan en desarrollar los hábitos y habilidades que los científicos e ingenieros usan en su vida diaria, fomentando el cuestionamiento, la investigación y la elaboración de conclusiones basadas en evidencias. Están formulados para ayudar a los alumnos a aprender cómo pensar, más que decirles qué pensar, mientras los docentes guían a los alumnos a generar sus propias conclusiones a través de pruebas y razonamiento. Mediante los NGSS, estamos preparando a las futuras generaciones a ser independientes, responsables y proactivas ante los retos actuales del mundo.

Los conceptos transversales, o CCCs, son una de las tres dimensiones de los NGSS. Son temas que aparecen una y otra vez a través de temas STEM. En los NRC’s “A Framework for K–12 Science Education,” los CCCs son definidos como “conceptos que hacen de puente entre los límites de disciplinas básicas, teniendo un valor explicativo a través de mucha de la ciencia y la ingeniería. Estos conceptos ayudan a proveer a los alumnos con un marco organizativo para conectar conocimientos de varias disciplinas en una visión coherente y científica.” (1)

Aunque puede que se vean ligeramente abstractos, los CCCs son cruciales para construir conocimientos de contenido y una comprensión de los procesos científicos. Mientras los alumnos progresan en su educación científica, estos conceptos aparecerán en múltiples disciplinas, una y otra vez, volviéndose cada vez más familiares. Funcionan como referentes a los que los alumnos vuelven mientras descubren nuevos fenómenos y entienden el sentido del mundo. (2)

Estos son los siete CCCs definidos en el NRC Framework y los NGSS: 

1. Patrones

Los patrones aparecen una y otra vez en la naturaleza y la ciencia, como en la simetría de las flores, el ciclo lunar, las estaciones y la estructura del ADN. Ser capaz de reconocer los patrones es importante para muchas tareas científicas, como la clasificación o analizar e interpretar datos. Los alumnos necesitas ser capaces no sólo de reconocer patrones, pero también hacer preguntas sobre por qué y cómo se dan los patrones . 

2. Causa y efecto: Mecanismo y explicación

Causa y efecto puede ser visto como el siguiente paso después de identificar patrones. Esta CCC trae consigo el descubrimiento de la causa subyacente de fenómenos, comprender conexiones y causas, y, finalmente averiguar por qué un suceso lleva a otro. Este concepto también ayudará a los alumnos cuando planifiquen y lleven a cabo investigaciones, o diseñen y testen soluciones.

3. Escala, proporción y cantidad

Una gran parte de investigar fenómenos implica compararlos usando escalas relativas (ej: más grande y más pequeño, más rápido y más lento) y describirlos usando unidades de, por ejemplo, peso, tiempo, temperatura, y volumen. Muchos de los fenómenos que los alumnos estudian están a una escala muy grande o muy pequeña para observarlas, y los modelos pueden ser usados para comprenderlos, como comparar los planetas del sistema solar a frutas de diferentes tamaños.  

4. Sistemas y modelos de sistemas

Para volver el mundo más fácil de investigar, los científicos suelen estudiar pequeñas unidades de investigaciones o “sistemas.” Un sistema contiene objetos que están relacionados y forman una unidad. Esto puede ser tan grande como una galaxia completa y tan pequeño como el sistema circulatorio humano. O incluso más pequeño como una sola molécula. Los modelos de sistemas son herramientas útiles para estudiar cómo un sistema se comporta y cómo interactúa con otros sistemas.

5. Energía y materia: Flujos, ciclos, y conservación

Añadiendo al concepto anterior, este enfatiza que la energía y la materia fluyen dentro y fuera de cualquier sistema. Por ejemplo, la luz del sol (energía) y el agua (materia) en una planta que necesita crecer, o incluso el flujo del agua en la atmósfera de la Tierra. Ser capaz de observar y desarrollar modelos de estos flujos y ciclos es importante en muchas áreas de la ciencia y la ingeniería.

6. Estructura y función

Este concepto se refiere a las formas, las relaciones, y las propiedades de materiales en sistemas naturales y humanos. En ingeniería, por ejemplo, comprender la estructura y función de diferentes materiales puede ayudar al ingeniero a crear un diseño más efectivo y exitoso.

7. Estabilidad y cambio

El último CCC tiene que ver con la comprensión de cómo el cambio ocurre en cualquier sistema y cómo podemos usar la tecnología para controlar este. También se enfoca en comprender conceptos como equilibrio dinámico, donde la estabilidad percibida de un sistema depende de un cambio constante. Por ejemplo: el flujo del agua a través de una presa que siempre tiene el mismo nivel del agua. También se enfoca en cambios de ciclo. Por ejemplo: la órbita constante de la luna alrededor de la Tierra afecta a las mareas.

Cada uno de estos conceptos transversales contiene una amplia variedad de ejemplos y aplicaciones para que los alumnos trabajen durante sus años escolares.

¿Cómo nos aseguramos de cubrir los CCCs? 

Para asegurar de cumplir las tres dimensiones de los NGSS, necesitas el apoyo de un programa NGSS que cubra de manera efectiva y completa dichos estándares. Twig Science es un programa de ciencias basado en fenómenos para edades de Preescolar a Secundaria creado específicamente para asegurar que todos los alumnos tienen un entendimiento interno de los conceptos transversales, las prácticas de ciencia e ingeniería y las ideas centrales interdisciplinares. En Twig Science, los alumnos descubren docenas de diferentes roles STEM a la vez que se vuelven más creativos en resolver problemas, entendiendo la ciencia de fenómenos del mundo real.

  1. https://www.nap.edu/catalog/13165/a-framework-for-k-12-science-education-practices-crosscutting-concepts
  2. Ibid.

¡Recibe las novedades de Twig Education!

Además de contenido académico gratuito directamente a tu bandeja de entrada 

¿Qué es el aprendizaje tridimensional? | NGSS

Los NGSS o Estándares de Ciencias de la Próxima Generación se enfocan en desarrollar los hábitos y habilidades que los científicos e ingenieros usan en su vida diaria, fomentando el cuestionamiento, la investigación y la elaboración de conclusiones basadas en evidencias. Están formulados para ayudar a los alumnos a aprender cómo pensar, más que decirles qué pensar, mientras los docentes guían a los alumnos a generar sus propias conclusiones a través de pruebas y razonamiento. Mediante los NGSS, estamos preparando a las futuras generaciones a ser independientes, responsables y proactivas ante los retos actuales del mundo.

¿Por qué necesitamos los NGSS?

El objetivo fundamental de la introducción de los Estándares de Ciencias de la Próxima Generación (Next Generation Science Standards) fue cambiar la enseñanza de ciencias como la conocíamos. La forma en la que solíamos conocerla, y mucha gente aún la entiende, no es una enseñanza que refleje la forma en la que la ciencia se usa en el mundo real. Los científicos e ingenieros de hoy abordan las ciencias de una forma práctica y activa en su día a día. Con la ayuda de los nuevos estándares, los docentes serán capaces de hacer que las ciencias sean más accesibles, más inspiradoras, y reflejen mejor nuestra sociedad actual.

En lugar de enfocarnos en memorización de datos, los NGSS se enfocan en habilidades importantes como la investigación, la comunicación, y el pensamiento analítico. Mientras el contenido de conocimientos sigue siendo parte de los estándares, el foco están en enseñar a a los alumnos cómo interesarse por conocimiento nuevo, responder a preguntas y resolver problemas, y hacer conexiones entre las diferentes disciplinas científicas, relacionándolas con la ciencia del mundo real. Aquí es donde el aprendizaje tridimensional entra en acción.

Aprendizaje tridimensional

La base de los NGSS son las tres “dimensiones” de aprendizaje científico:

  1. Prácticas de ciencia e ingeniería (SEP)
  2. Conceptos transversales (CCC)
  3. Ideas Centrales Disciplinares (DCI)

Cada estándar, o expectativas de rendimiento, está apoyada por estas tres dimensiones. Las SEPs y los CCCs están diseñadas para ser enseñadas en contexto, mientras el foco está en un pequeño número de DCIs que ayuda a los alumnos a ganar una comprensión completa de las disciplinas científicas. Juntas, las tres dimensiones reflejan de una forma fidedigna como las ciencias y la ingeniería se practica en el mundo real.

Las prácticas de ciencia e ingeniería (SEP) destacan métodos que los científicos e ingenieros realmente usan como parte de su trabajo, cómo el desarrollo de modelos, explicaciones y ser activo en la crítica y evaluación. Las SEPs requieren que los alumnos aprendan haciendo, mientras adquieren habilidades que pueden ser aplicadas a problemas a través de todas las disciplinas STEM. Las SEPs son ocho:

  1. Plantear preguntas (para ciencia) y definir problemas (para ingeniería)
  2. Desarrollar y usar modelos
  3. Planear y desarrollar investigaciones
  4. Analizar e interpretar los datos
  5. Usar las matemáticas y el pensamiento computacional
  6. Construir explicaciones (para ciencia) y diseñar soluciones (para ingeniería)
  7. Defender argumentos respaldados por evidencias
  8. Obtener, evaluar, y comunicar información

Aprende más sobre las SEPs

Los conceptos transversales son ideas que aparecen a través de diversas áreas de STEM. Dan a los alumnos “un marco organizativo para conectar el conocimiento de varias disciplinas” e incluyen conceptos como causa y efecto, energía y materia, estabilidad y cambio.

  1. Patrones
  2. Causa y efecto
  3. Escala, proporción y cantidad
  4. Sistemas y modelos de sistemas
  5. Energía y materia
  6. Estructura y función
  7. Estabilidad y cambio

Aprende más sobre los CCCs

Las ideas centrales disciplinares pueden ser simplemente definidas como “contenidos de conocimientos.” Son esas ideas que son cruciales para comprender las disciplinas científicas, y pueden ser un concepto clave a una disciplina específica o relevante para más de una disciplina. Están divididos en cuatro dominios de contenido:

  1. Ciencias de la vida
  2. Ciencias de la Tierra y el espacio
  3. Ciencias físicas
  4. Ingeniería, tecnología, y la aplicación de la ciencia

Aprende más sobre las DCIs.

Juntas, las tres dimensiones crean oportunidades para aprender cómo pensar y actuar como científicos e ingenieros, mientras cubren contenido de aprendizaje necesario. El aprendizaje tridimensional ayuda a maximinar el interés de los alumnos y mejorar los resultados de aprendizaje.

¿Buscas un auténtico programa tridimensional NGSS? Descubre Twig Science

¡Recibe las novedades de Twig Education!

Además de contenido académico gratuito directamente a tu bandeja de entrada 

La importancia de los NGSS

¿Por qué es importante un buen sistema educativo STEM?

En una sociedad que evoluciona a pasos agigantados, las carreras STEM generan cada vez más demanda. Estos trabajos son cruciales para el desarrollo y la innovación, tanto si es desarrollando nuevas medicinas o buscando soluciones para enfrentar el cambio climático. Como resultado, si estamos preparando a los alumnos para liderar la economía global y perseguir las oportunidades laborales de todo tipo, tenemos que equiparles con una educación de calidad desde Preescolar hasta Secundaria.

¿Cómo ha cambiado la enseñanza de ciencias en los últimos años?

A lo largo de la última década, la educación en ciencias a nivel internacional ha experimentado una transformación. Por ejemplo, antes de la introducción de los NGSS en los 2010s, las escuelas estadounidenses seguían los llamados National Science Education Standards del National Research Council (NRC) y los Benchmarks for Science Literacy de la American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) para la enseñanza de ciencias en la escuela. 

Ambos marcos fueron formulados a comienzos de los 1990s y rápidamente quedaron obsoletos. Los alumnos estaban aprendiendo teoría sin aprender los principios subyacentes que hacen que la teoría funcione. Y es que para tener éxito en campos STEM y otras carreras modernas, las nuevas generaciones necesitan aprender habilidades importantes del siglo 21 como la investigación, la comunicación y el pensamiento crítico basado en evidencias.

¿Cómo se desarrollaron los Next Generation Science Standards (Estándares de Ciencias de la Próxima Generación? ¿Qué les hace diferentes de los estándares anteriores?

Para reflejar las nuevas demandas de un mundo que cambia rápidamente, el National Research Council reveló el informe “A Framework for K–12 Science Education” en 2011. Este marco detalla lo que los alumnos de Preescolar a Secundaria deberían de aprender en ciencias, con un enfoque en habilidades científicas y métodos junto con la comprensión de procesos científicos.

El marco formó entonces las bases del desarrollo de los Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS). Un consorcio de 26 estados junto a NRC, AAAS, la National Science Teachers Association (NSTA), y la organización sin ánimo de lucro Achieve trabajaron juntos para desarrollar estos estándares. Docentes, profesionales del mundo de las ciencias y la política, académicos de estudios superiores, líderes de negocios y profesionales expertos STEM también participaron en el desarrollo de estos estándares.

En 2013 se publicó el borrador final de los estándares. Los estándares destacan la importancia de que los alumnos piensen y actúen como científicos e ingenieros. En lugar de sólo aprender datos, se espera de los alumnos que apliquen métodos que los científicos e ingenieros usan en su trabajo diario.

¿Qué aceptación han tenido los NGSS?

A día de hoy 20 estados de EUA han desarrollado los NGSS y 24 estados más han desarrollado sus estándares basados en el NRC Framework y los NGSS. Como resultado, el 71% de los alumnos en los EUA recibe una educación en ciencias que sigue este marco de referencia. (1)

¿Qué son las tres dimensiones de los NGSS?

Los NGSS cubren una demanda en educación que previamente no había sido abordada, priorizando la metodología y el contenido con la práctica. Este marco está basado en tres dimensiones de aprendizaje científico que se complementan mutuamente, uniendo la práctica con la teoría: Prácticas de ciencia e ingeniería (SEPs), Conceptos transversales (CCCs), e Ideas centrales disciplinares (DCIs).

Aprende más sobre las tres dimensiones de los NGSS.

Para resumir, los NGSS se enfocan en desarrollar los hábitos y habilidades que los científicos e ingenieros usan en su vida diaria, fomentando el cuestionamiento, la investigación y la elaboración de conclusiones basadas en evidencias. Están formulados para ayudar a los alumnos a aprender cómo pensar, más que decirles qué pensar, mientras los docentes guían a los alumnos a generar sus propias conclusiones a través de pruebas y razonamiento. Mediante los NGSS, estamos preparando a las futuras generaciones a ser independientes, responsables y proactivas ante los retos actuales del mundo.  

Twig Science: un auténtico programa NGSS

Twig Science es un programa completo de Preescolar a Secundaria creado para los NGSS que conecta fenómenos del mundo real con aprendizaje en tres dimensiones. Twig Science está diseñado para hacer que incluso docentes no especialistas en los NGSS enseñen con un sistema educativo de calidad. Incluye recursos de apoyo para imprimir y digitales para una planificación de lecciones flexible, un centro digital de evaluación de vanguardia, y una plataforma innovadora y fácil de usar. Descubre más.

  1. https://ngss.nsta.org/About.aspx

¡Recibe las novedades de Twig Education!

Además de contenido académico gratuito directamente a tu bandeja de entrada